INBRED (2011) Reviews and overview

 

‘They came in peace. They left in pieces.’

Inbred is a 2011 British-German comedy horror feature film directed by Alex Chandon (Drill Bit) from a screenplay co-written by Paul Shrimpton.

Plot:

Youth offenders sentenced to community service with their supervisors are taken out into the countryside to a remote Yorkshire village.

After a minor incident with some inbred kids occurs, the group are soon hunted by the grotesquely evil townspeople in a nightmarish fight for survival…

Reviews [click links to read more]:

Alex Chandon’s first film for ten years is a gory, gloopy post-pub treat. Its nasty zeal enables it to transcend the usual comedy-horror limitations as it becomes a demented Straw Dogs homage. It stops rather than ends but the journey along the way is peppered with enough bad taste and general loopy behaviour to make it well worth your while.

Will Holland, MOVIES and MANIA

Other reviews:

“Solid characterisation, crisp storytelling, glorious
production design (by Melanie Light), hilariously straight-faced
performances and unstinting gore combine to create a hugely
enjoyable film […] O’Neill has an absolute ball as the pub landlord and village ringleader.” MJ Simpson, 21st Century British Horror Films, Volume 2: White Settlers and Women in Black, 2021

“The one thing that the film does very well is presenting most of the group as so thoroughly unlikeable that when the (totally unsurprising) first death does come you wish it had happened earlier. After that point, the film grinds to a half pace and it becomes merely uninteresting and slightly embarrassing. In truth, the only really offensive thing about this film is how poor it was….” Flickering Myth

“The warped variety show the kids stumble into – with its trouser-less organist “Clayderman” and grim forms of 3D entertainment – owes too much to Python, The League of Gentlemen and Channel 4’s late-night gem Focus North; co-writer/director Alex Chandon may also be the first person since That’s Life!‘s Doc Cox to find phallus-shaped carrots so funny.” The Guardian

“No, I won’t compare it with Shaun of the Dead or Tucker & Dale, because Inbred is in its own brilliant league. It’s darker, gorier and has a Monty Python-esque Grand Guignol atmosphere. I’m of course too young to have experienced real Grand Guignol, but I’m sure Inbred is pretty close to that once was the hottest entertainment in Le Gay Paris.” Ninja Dixon

“Awfully mean-spirited and often sickeningly gory, I would normally never recommend the likes of Inbred. But the technical virtues of filmmaking on display here, coupled with a roster of well-played incredible characters, go far in redeeming the film. So if you have the stomach for it I do urge you to check this out.” Screen Anarchy

“There’s a show put on in a barn for a group of inbreds that is so demented it feels surreal, and the utterly nihilistic, colorful and filthy brutality brings to mind Devil’s Rejects. One nasty death involves the use of a manure spreader. Flaws include some really stupid scenes where they abandon a vehicle for no good reason, or the really obvious one where a victim can obviously escape but doesn’t.” The Worldwide Celluloid Massacre

“From the same genre as Simon Sprackling’s deliriously demented Funny Man, Inbred offers death by chopper, death by horse, even death by faeces. Chandon embraces old-style visual effects to lend the proceedings a distinctive ‘80s vibe as the film enters Grand Guignol territory. And it works perfectly.” Tony Earnshaw, The Yorkshire Post

Cast and characters:

Jo Hartley as Kate
Seamus O’Neill as Jim
James Doherty as Jeff
James Burrows as Tim
Neil Leiper as Gris
Chris Waller as Dwight
Nadine Rose Mulkerrin as Sam
Terry Haywood as Zeb
Damien Lloyd-Davies as Rats
Derek Melling as Greg
Mark Rathbone as Ron
Dominic Brunt as Podge – Attack of the Killer Babies
Emily Booth as June
Simon Coomes as Toby

Filming locations:

Thirsk, Yorkshire