BLOODTHIRSTY (2020) Reviews of female werewolf movie

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[Total: 14   Average: 2.9/5]

‘Music should be more than skin deep’

Bloodthirsty is a 2020 Canadian horror feature film about a young female singer who finds herself turning into a werewolf while she records her first album.

Directed by Amelia Moses from a screenplay co-written by Wendy Hill-Tout and Lowell, the movie stars Lauren Beatty, Katharine King So and Judith Buchan.

Plot:

Grey (Lauren Beatty), an indie singer, whose first album was a smash hit, gets an invitation to work with notorious music producer Vaughn Daniels at his remote studio in the woods. Together with her girlfriend/lover Charlie (Katharine King So), they arrive at his mansion, and the work begins.

However, Grey is having visions that she is a wolf and as her work with the emotionally demanding Vaughn deepens, the vegan singer begins to hunger for meat and the hunt. As Grey starts to transform into a werewolf, she begins to find out who she really is, and begins to discover the family she never knew.

What will it take to become a great artist and at what cost to her humanity? As Grey completes her new album, Charlie tries to warn her about Vaughn, but Grey won’t abandon the album. Will Grey do whatever it takes to become a great artist, as she uncovers the truth about her past, her future, her family and ultimately herself…

Reviews [click links to read more]:

” …focus on audio carries through the entire film, with the increasingly horrific sequences and evolution of Grey’s songwriting subject-matter mirroring each other. Although a few areas of the plot could have been fleshed (no pun intended) out a bit more and the dialogue and actors’ chemistry felt slightly stiff at times, Bloodthirsty is guaranteed to be unlike any werewolf horror film you’ve ever seen.” The Austin Chronicle

“Soaked in the beautiful atmosphere of the secluded cabin surrounded by snow, Bloodthirsty is a unique take on the classic werewolf story, contrasting Grey’s physical transformation with the newfound inner freedom that allows her to tap into the darkest places of her soul for her creativity.” Bad Feeling

“It’s a layered and character-focused film that hits hard on its emotional moments and features some fantastically nuanced performances and a sense of atmosphere that fits right in with the current state of horror. It might have taken a while for the style to grab onto a werewolf film, but Bloodthirsty combines the two with emphatic fervor.” Blood Brothers

Bloodthirsty‘s unique premise and the way it was carried out through the character of Grey was executed well. Though there weren’t many moments in the film that used practical scares, the way Grey’s visions were shown were enough to bring moments of true horror […] This is a film that I will definitely watch again once it becomes available for home viewing.” But Why Tho?

“The power dynamics at play between Grey and Vaughn load the story with suspense— Beatty and Bryk each refuse to let the audience take their eyes of them while onscreen. Moses squeezes out ever last bit of nerve-shredding tension in the realism of a young woman being preyed upon by a powerful man. She uses the werewolf to explore the potential for tragedy when we value a person’s art over their mental or physical well-being.” Father Son Holy Gore

” …the slow-burn approach works here two-fold and makes the blood, gore and teeth pieces fly late in the film. Bloodthirsty is heartbreaking, transformative and gory, and takes you in places that few lycan films have gone before.” iHorror

“The storyline can be a bit convoluted at times as it tries to figure out what exactly it is trying to explore. However, the direction provided by Amelia Moses, the strength of the songs featured in the script, and the performances delivered by Lauren Beatty and Greg Bryk help to give some heft to the script.” Nightmarish Conjurings

“There’s a solid, simple story and a soundtrack filled with haunting original songs (by Lowell) that make it memorable. Bryk and Beatty are effective as two creators-turned-destroyers battling their inner demons, and the film is a metaphor for the cutthroat nature of the music industry where artists must decide if they want to become the predator or the prey.” Screen Zealots

” …the script isn’t quite tight enough to work as a psychological horror film. It spreads itself a bit too thin trying to cover relationship issues, LGBTQ issues, the nature of creating art and power dynamics in the recording industry. It’s hard to find time for all that and still be scary. It also doesn’t help that the plot twist that kicks off the last act is almost cringingly contrived and clichéd.” Voices from the Balcony

” …its queer, female lead and focus on character over mindless jump scares, not to mention the top-notch practical effects on display throughout, put it firmly in the category occupied by the likes of Late Phases and Dog Soldiers. It may not be an all-timer but Moses’ movie certainly offers a fresh take on a well-trodden myth that many before her, with considerably more money no doubt, have struggled to master.” Wicked Horror

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Background:

“We have a hybrid, a mix of a human and a wolf. It’s a bit more grotesque, a bit weirder, and we still get the emotion of the main character, even when she’s a werewolf,” Amelia Moses told THR of her work on the wolf transformation with Dave Trainor, a veteran make-up and prosthetics maker on TV series such as Fargo and Wynonna Earp.

Cast and characters:

Lauren Beatty … Grey
Katharine King So … Charlie
Judith Buchan … Vera
Lowell … Gretta
Jesse Gervais … Reporter
Jayce McKenzie … Hitchhiker

Filming locations:

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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