Silent Predators – USA, 1999 – reviews

Silent Predators is a 1999 made-for-television horror film directed by Noel Nosseck from a screenplay by John Carpenter (The Thing; The Fog; Halloween), William S. Gillmore and Matt Dorff, based upon a story by Patricia Arrigoni and Fred Brown.

This film is one of a growing number that exploit the fear of snakes and despite its title, the snakes featured are mutant rattlesnakes.

Main cast:

Harry Hamlin, Shannon Sturges, Jack Scalia, Patty McCormack, David Spielberg, Phillip Troy Linger, Beau Billingslea, David Whitney and David Webb.

Buy: Amazon.co.uk

Reviews:

“While Silent Predators does serve up some excruciating character scenes of its own, it leavens them with a healthy and, more importantly, almost constant stream of snake scenes – or at worst snake shots, used as a linking device, to show the snakes closing in on San Catalano.” And You Call Yourself a Scientist!

“Like any Killer Snake Movie, there are lots of shots from the Rattlesnake POV Cam during the stalking scenes. Alas, most of these scenes are pretty tame (this was a made for TV movie after all), but it certainly has its moments. The scene where the snakes cause havoc at a Little League game is kinda cool, and the bit where a snake menaces a woman on her exercise bike is good for a laugh too.” Mitch Lovell, The Video Vacuum

“Even though the snake den scenes are so atrocious you can barely see the snakes in them, you can see that all sorts of real snakes were used here, even an Australian Black-headed Python masquerading as a California Kingsnake because, for some reason, much of this movie was made in Australia.” CaliforniaHerps.com

“I have to give them a hearty round of applause for using 90% real snakes.  This may have been the last hurrah for low-to-mid budget made-for-television reptile horror movies that (mostly) eschew CGI.” Sean Gill, Junta Jueil’s Culture Shock

“I guess I shouldn’t grumble too much as at least they are real snakes and not computer generated. The threat that they pose is never given enough time to really convince you that they could do some damage. The attacks aren’t scary and there’s too few of them to really worry about anyway.” Andrew Smith, Popcorn Pictures

 

IMDb

 

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