DRAGON FURY (2021) Review and overview

 

‘They thought that they could control it. They were wrong!’

Dragon Fury is a 2021 British fantasy horror film about a military team who discover a deadly creature lurking in the mountains. Also known as Dragon’s Fury

Directed and edited by Scott Jeffrey (Rats RebornBad Nun: Deadly VowsDon’t SpeakCupidClownDoll) from a screenplay co-written with visual effects designer Rhys Waterfield (Dinosaur Hotel).

The Jagged Edge Productions movie stars Nicola Wright (Hatched; Amityville Cornfield; Don’t Speak), Chelsea Greenwood (Amityville Cornfield; Bad Nun: Deadly Vows; Return of the Tooth Fairy), Sofia Lacey, Chrissie Wunna, Andrew Rolfe, Richard Lovell, Rachel Roberts and Nigel Stone.

Reviews:

“So what do we get here? A small dragon attack at the beginning, a boat-load of talking from the human cast, and the re-appearance of a small dragon at the end… With a coda that threatens an even larger dragon for a possible dragons vs human sequel. Yeah, so you’ve guessed it, there’s not many furious dragons in Dragon Fury.” Nerdly

” …the CGI for both the creature and its fiery breath ranges between acceptable and bargain-basement quality. This is too bad because the dragon itself is pretty cool looking. The plot itself turns out to be bargain basement as well, devolving into some well-worn cliches as it goes on. It all finishes with an utterly predictable last half hour where you can guess who dies and in what order.” Voices from the Balcony

Release date:

September in the UK and October 6th 2021 in the USA.

Cast and characters:

Nicola Wright … Vanessa ‘Ness’ Reid
Chelsea Greenwood … Libby Thornton
Sofia Lacey … Lexy Warren
Chrissie Wunna … Nicole Folland
Andrew Rolfe … Stuart Palson
Richard Lovell … General Marshall
Rachel Roberts … Linda
Nigel Stone … Peter

Technical details:

88 minutes

More dragon movies

Trailer:

MOVIES and MANIA mini-review and rating:

The film begins promisingly with an early appearance by the dragon and a gorgeous rugged rural setting (where we are informed no animals exist due to radiation, despite a couple of ponies being clearly visible later on). Unfortunately, the plot soon gets bogged down mainly indoors with the kind of wrangling and recriminations that often replaces action in low-budget creature features. Meanwhile, the deployment of a highly unlikely trio of waffling (military?) special operatives, one of whom is on a crutch (!) is likely to warrant more viewer disbelief than a flying angry dragon.

For much of the movie, the only ‘fury’ is likely to be from viewers vainly waiting to see the beastie again in this mostly dull Dragon Drama. It all leads to a breathtakingly silly reveal. Minor pluses are that Nicola Wright puts in a better performance than we are used to in similar British micro-budget monster movies and Josh Reichental’s score is notable.